WI-HER News

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WI-HER News2017-01-03T09:57:44+00:00
102, 2018

Yemen’s Local Green Revolution: Empowerment of Women and Youth

By Hania Bekdash, Graduate Research Intern, and Erin Taylor, Program Officer, WI-HER, LLC For anyone familiar with Yemen and its history, “resilient” is a common term used to describe its locals, particularly women, who have experienced a long string of conflicts in recent decades. Already the poorest country in the region, Yemenis were no stranger to electricity shortages even before 2015. Still, poverty rates nearly doubled from 2014 to 2016, making purchasing fuel for typical generators increasingly difficult as many parts of the country have no government-provided electricity whatsoever. With food, water, cooking gas, and fuel exceedingly limited since the start of the Arab Coalition bombardments in 2015, many issues that more directly impact women are exacerbated by the near total destruction of the state’s electricity grids. […]

612, 2017

Gender and Zika – Part I: Gender-Based Violence

By: Erin Taylor, Program Officer While the Zika virus is today known for its prevalence in Latin America, it was actually identified in and named after a forest in Uganda in 1947. The virus is mostly spread by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito although it can be spread from mother to child during pregnancy, through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions, or through exposure in a laboratory or healthcare setting. There is currently no vaccine and as of August 2017, 48 countries in the Americas have confirmed cases of the virus. Of those infected, it appears that the majority have been women. A 2015-2016 CDC study in Puerto Rico showed that “among all cases of Zika virus disease in nonpregnant persons, 61% were in females; in all age groups females accounted for the majority of cases.” This study observed similar findings in Brazil and El Salvador. This begs the question – why are women and girls more susceptible to Zika than men and boys? […]

1210, 2017

Invisible to policy: where are female youth among refugees in Kampala?

By Katie Krueger Uganda has one of the most progressive policies on refugees in Africa, and even in the world: refugees are settled in communities, as opposed to camps, where they are provided with plots of land to cultivate, and encouraged to sell surplus produce in local markets, which are supported with aid money. This approach benefits both refugees and local residents in and around those communities. The Guardian once even asked if Uganda was the best place in the world to be a refugee, highlighting the nation’s efforts to provide better economic and social opportunities for those fleeing conflict and hardship in neighboring countries. These progressive policies, however, do not necessarily extend to refugees who have chosen to leave these specifically designated communities – or bypassed them entirely – to live in urban centers instead. Exact numbers are hard to determine, but 12% or more of the 1.8 million residents of Kampala are refugees; over 200,000 refugees live in the city, particularly in the slums of Kisenyi, Katwe, Makindye, and Masajja. (Most of them come from Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC); an increasing number of recent arrivals are South Sudanese.) […]

1010, 2017

Approche en 6 étapes pour identifier et combler les écarts liés au genre

This is the French-language version of our video about the six-step approach to help teams integrate gender into improvement activities. Le partenaire d’ASSIST, WI-HER, LLC, a mis au point une approche innovante et efficace en 6 étapes pour aider les équipes d’ASSIST à intégrer le genre dans les activités d’amélioration pour identifier et combler les écarts liés au genre. Cette approche a été testée dans divers programmes et pays d’ASSIST et elle a permis d’obtenir une meilleure utilisation des services et une meilleure rétention en matière de soins, ainsi qu’une diminution des événements indésirables.

310, 2017

El abordaje de seis pasos para identificar y cerrar las brechas relacionadas con el género

This is the Spanish-language version of our video about the six-step approach to help teams integrate gender into improvement activities. Este video en español se presenta nuestro abordaje de seis pasos para identificar y cerrar las brechas relacionadas con el género. ASSIST utiliza un abordaje holístico para integrar el género durante el mejoramiento de la calidad de atención en salud. WI-HER, LLC ha desarrollado un abordaje innovador y efectivo de seis pasos para ayudar a los equipos de ASSIST en la integración del género en las actividades de mejoramiento y para identificar y cerrar brechas relacionadas con el género. Este método se ha probado en varios programas de ASSIST y ha logrado mejorar la utilización de los servicios y la retención en la atención y ha contribuido a la reducción de los eventos adversos. En este video, Dr. Taroub Harb Faramand de WI-HER, LLC explica cada uno de los seis pasos utilizando ejemplos de la vida real. Ella muestra que si se implementan las intervenciones de mejoramiento sin considerar la dinámica del género, se corre el riesgo de no alcanzar a la mitad de la población la cual puede explotar o hacer daño a uno de los géneros, sin intentar de hacerlo.

1909, 2017

How to Conduct a Gender Analysis

The USAID ASSIST Project integrates gender considerations in quality improvement in order to improve outcomes for all — women and men, girls and boys. ASSIST partner WI-HER, LLC developed an innovative and effective six-step approach to help ASSIST teams integrate gender in order to identify and close gender-related gaps in improvement activities. This video explains the first step in detail: how to conduct a gender analysis.

1209, 2017

Six-step approach to help teams integrate gender into improvement activities

The USAID ASSIST Project recognizes that integrating gender into all project activities has the potential to improve outcomes for women and men, boys and girls. ASSIST partner WI-HER, LLC developed an innovative and effective six-step approach to help ASSIST teams integrate gender in order to identify and close gender-related gaps in improvement activities. It has been tested in a variety of ASSIST programs and countries and has achieved improved service utilization and retention in care as well as a decrease in adverse events. In this video, Dr. Taroub Harb Faramand of WI-HER, LLC explains each of the six steps and provides real life examples. She shows that gender integration is critical in improvement activities because without considering gender dynamics, improvement risks failing to reach half of the population and unintentionally exploiting or harming women or men, boys or girls.

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